Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Benefits & Impacts

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $56 million in Yukon, or 2.1% of territorial GDP
  • $76 million in the Northwest Territories, or 1.7% of territorial GDP
  • $48 million in Nunavut, or 2.0% of territorial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $543 million in New Brunswick, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $874 million in Nova Scotia, or 2.3% of provincial GDP
  • $108 million in Prince Edward Island in 2016, or 1.9% of provincial GDP
  • $414 million in Newfoundland and Labrador, or 1.4% of provincial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $25.7 billion in Ontario in 2016, or 3.5% of provincial GDP. In Quebec, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $11.0 billion in 2016, or 3.0% of provincial GDP.

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $7.2 billion in British Columbia, or 2.9% of provincial GDP
  • $5.3 billion in Alberta, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $915 million in Saskatchewan, or 1.3% of provincial GDP
  • $1.6 billion in Manitoba, or 2.5% of provincial GDP

Using the product perspective, Statistics Canada estimates that the direct economic impact of culture products was $53.8 billion in Canada in 2016, or 2.8% of overall GDP. The employment estimate was 652,400 in 2016, or 3.5% of the 18.5 million jobs in the country.

Statistics Canada’s recent release of Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) provides estimates of the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage, similar to the 2010 and 2013 Culture Satellite Account (CSA). The PTCI estimates for 2015 and 2016 are based on economic projections, so they should not be considered as precise as the data for 2010 through 2014 (which could be considered “actuals” rather than “projections”).

Primarily based on a survey of over 7,500 Australians 15 and older (as well as similar surveys in 2009 and 2013), this report outlines key data on Australians’ arts participation, recognition of the value of the arts, and attitudes toward the arts. A key finding of the report is that 98% of Australians engaged with the arts in some way in 2016.

This international literature review attempts “to better understand whether research has shown that arts experiences of any kind – whether conventional audience experiences or newer “engagement” experiences, learning in the arts, or making art itself – affect civic engagement”. A key finding of the report is that “correlations between arts participation and the motivations and practices of civic engagement are substantial and consistent.” However, “the effects of the arts are likely to be cumulative over significant time and difficult to document: a slow drip rather than a sudden eruption, and easy to take for granted”.

Based on a survey of more than 2,000 Canadians (including substantial samples of youth and Indigenous residents), this report highlights information about arts and heritage attendance, personal arts participation, as well as perceptions of cultural activities and government arts support. The report concludes that there is “robust public engagement with arts and culture in Canada”.

Based on a custom-designed 2016 Survey of the Inuit Arts Economy and Statistics Canada’s 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this report outlines the economic impacts of Inuit arts in Canada. Overall, the report finds that “the Inuit arts economy contributed $87.2 million” to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and “sustained over 2,700 full time equivalent jobs” in 2016.