Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Economic impacts

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $56 million in Yukon, or 2.1% of territorial GDP
  • $76 million in the Northwest Territories, or 1.7% of territorial GDP
  • $48 million in Nunavut, or 2.0% of territorial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $543 million in New Brunswick, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $874 million in Nova Scotia, or 2.3% of provincial GDP
  • $108 million in Prince Edward Island in 2016, or 1.9% of provincial GDP
  • $414 million in Newfoundland and Labrador, or 1.4% of provincial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $25.7 billion in Ontario in 2016, or 3.5% of provincial GDP. In Quebec, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $11.0 billion in 2016, or 3.0% of provincial GDP.

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $7.2 billion in British Columbia, or 2.9% of provincial GDP
  • $5.3 billion in Alberta, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $915 million in Saskatchewan, or 1.3% of provincial GDP
  • $1.6 billion in Manitoba, or 2.5% of provincial GDP

Using the product perspective, Statistics Canada estimates that the direct economic impact of culture products was $53.8 billion in Canada in 2016, or 2.8% of overall GDP. The employment estimate was 652,400 in 2016, or 3.5% of the 18.5 million jobs in the country.

Statistics Canada’s recent release of Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) provides estimates of the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage, similar to the 2010 and 2013 Culture Satellite Account (CSA). The PTCI estimates for 2015 and 2016 are based on economic projections, so they should not be considered as precise as the data for 2010 through 2014 (which could be considered “actuals” rather than “projections”).

Based on a survey of more than 2,000 Canadians (including substantial samples of youth and Indigenous residents), this report highlights information about arts and heritage attendance, personal arts participation, as well as perceptions of cultural activities and government arts support. The report concludes that there is “robust public engagement with arts and culture in Canada”.

Based on a custom-designed 2016 Survey of the Inuit Arts Economy and Statistics Canada’s 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this report outlines the economic impacts of Inuit arts in Canada. Overall, the report finds that “the Inuit arts economy contributed $87.2 million” to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and “sustained over 2,700 full time equivalent jobs” in 2016.

(Les arts et la culture au Québec : Portrait de la perception des Québécois)

Based on an online survey of 1,410 Quebec residents (18 and older) in September 2015, this report highlights the public’s perceptions of artists, their role in society, impacts of the cultural sector, and the governmental role in supporting culture. In general, 77% of respondents believe that the arts and culture are important to them. Annual arts participation rates are 78% for cinemas, 71% for the performing arts, and 49% for museums.

This report presents the results of a random telephone survey of 1,004 Ontario residents (18 and older) in early March 2017, bearing a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Respondents were asked a series of questions about their perceptions of the arts in Ontario, with specific questions regarding the quality of life, well-being, identity, belonging, and public arts funding. A vast majority of Ontarians believe that the arts are somewhat or very important to their own lives (85%) and to life in their community (90%).