Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Other topics

Primarily based on a survey of over 7,500 Australians 15 and older (as well as similar surveys in 2009 and 2013), this report outlines key data on Australians’ arts participation, recognition of the value of the arts, and attitudes toward the arts. A key finding of the report is that 98% of Australians engaged with the arts in some way in 2016.

Culture Track summarizes survey findings related to Americans’ cultural engagement as well as the “attitudes, motivators, and barriers to participation”. The top motivators for cultural participation are having fun (chosen by 81% of respondents), interest in the content (78%), experiencing new things (76%), feeling less stressed (also 76%), and learning something new (71%). Across all types of cultural activities, the top barrier to participation is the belief that “it’s not for someone like me”. Survey results indicate that “audiences have different needs and wants at different times – or even simultaneously”.

This international literature review attempts “to better understand whether research has shown that arts experiences of any kind – whether conventional audience experiences or newer “engagement” experiences, learning in the arts, or making art itself – affect civic engagement”. A key finding of the report is that “correlations between arts participation and the motivations and practices of civic engagement are substantial and consistent.” However, “the effects of the arts are likely to be cumulative over significant time and difficult to document: a slow drip rather than a sudden eruption, and easy to take for granted”.

The nine video presentations in this series outline findings “from three years of strategic experimentation and shared learning” by seven arts organizations, with the overarching goal of better understanding “how to engage with audiences and build communities”.

The key to success might be risk tolerance, not talent

Drawing on the results of a variety of mostly American surveys, this brief article argues that there are “troubling signs that socioeconomic status does correlate with access to a professional arts career”.

Results of the 2015 SNAAP Survey Module

This report, based on responses from 26,200 alumni of arts programs in 43 American institutions, provides “insights into the current state of career skills and entrepreneurship education in arts schools”. The author argues that “building strong business and entrepreneurial skills will prepare [arts] students for a career in a job market that increasingly rewards entrepreneurship”.

A discussion paper on multidisciplinarity in the arts in Canada

Based on 11 case studies of Canadian artists, collectives, and organizations engaged in multidisciplinary practices, this report identifies “key characteristics of multidisciplinary approaches … to develop and sustain their practices, activities and structures” as well as their key challenges and opportunities. The report notes that multidisciplinary artists’ “activities include the mixing of artistic disciplines, community- and socially-engaged arts, Aboriginal and culturally diverse arts practices, technology, science, and the blending of for-profit and not-for-profit mandates, among others."

Activities, incomes, health, and career development

This survey of 532 Canadian dance performers examines “their dance work, their demographic and family situation, their working lives and incomes, their health and well-being, as well as their career development and transitions”.

This brief article, based on data from various American sources, argues that “cultural organizations are not (primarily) asking for money when they aim to secure visitation. Cultural organizations are asking for an investment of time – and that is much more complicated and a bigger ask than many leaders may realize.”

(La fréquentation des arts de la scène au Québec en 2016, Optique culture #56)

This recent report from Quebec’s cultural observatory analyzes performances, paid attendance, and box office revenues related to theatre, dance, music, comedy, circus, and magic performances in 2016, based on a census of Quebec-based performing arts presenters. The 17,200 performances with an admission fee in Quebec in 2016 (a 1% increase from 2009) attracted 7.1 million paid attendees (a 5% decrease from 2009).