Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Artists' situations: earnings, number, etc.

An Overview of Results from the Artist Survey of 2014

With funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Saskatchewan Partnership for Arts Research (SPAR) undertook a survey of Saskatchewan artists, receiving 348 responses. An important finding of the survey is the degree to which respondents engage in artistic activities in multiple disciplines. In fact, the survey found that just 26% of respondents selected only one artistic discipline. The average number of disciplines selected by each respondent was 2.8.

A multi-method, cross-genre examination of how US based musicians and composers are earning a living

This series of reports examines the revenues of musicians and composers in the United States based on an online survey (5,371 respondents), in-person interviews with more than 80 musicians, and six case studies of musicians' financial records. While the survey sample is very large, the online methodology (where individuals self-select whether to respond) may not provide a statistically representative, randomized sample of all U.S. musicians.

(Un portrait de la chanson québécoise)

Prepared for a 2013 Forum on Quebec Song, this French-language opinion piece attempts to stimulate reflection on the state of Quebec song and French-language song in particular.  Raising important questions, the article examines topics such as internationalization, technological change, touring, training, and funding. The article argues that “these days, much imagination is required to develop new sources of revenue” for singers, songwriters, and music groups.

Unlike some other countries, including Canada, visual artists in the United Kingdom do not have a standard fee structure for exhibiting in public galleries. The “Paying Artists” campaign, which is attempting to change that, has produced a number of research reports.A 2013 survey of 1,061 artists was conducted and summarized in a report on “Phase 1 Findings”.

An analysis of the educational backgrounds of working artists and the labour market activities of arts program graduates in Canada

Based on the 2013 National Graduates Survey and the 2011 National Household Survey, this report examines the labour force situation of arts graduates and the post-secondary education of artists in Canada.

Canada Dance Mapping Study

This large-scale survey, completed by 8,124 Canadians 16 or older, aimed to develop “a better understanding of who dances in Canada, where they dance, and why”. The majority of survey respondents were identified as “leisure dance participants” (5,948, or 73%), with the remaining 2,176 respondents (or 27%) being dance professionals. Respondents identified 190 different dance forms in which they participate.

A National Study on the Lives of Art Graduates and Working Artists

Using data from two large-scale American surveys, this report examines the situation of the estimated 1.2 million working artists and 2 million arts graduates over 25 years of age. One of the key findings of the report is that only 200,000 Americans are both arts graduates and working artists (representing 10% of all arts graduates and 16% of all working artists). In other words, “the majority of arts graduates work in non-arts fields”.

A three year tracking study of early career artists looking at the key factors that influence the development of their careers

In 2012, the Australia Council surveyed 310 artists who were within the first five years of their careers in order to examine key elements of their career development as well as differences between grant recipients and non-recipients. “Making financial sacrifices and taking financial risks” were seen as key factors that could allow artists to spend more time on their creative practice.

(Le travail des artistes au Québec est-il payé à sa juste valeur ?)

Based on a survey of 407 French-language audiovisual artists who are members of six Quebec associations, this report examines whether “precariousness has become a normalized part of working conditions in this sector of culture”.

A Report on the Socio-Economic Status of Canadian Visual Artists

This series of brief web articles aims to depict “the socio-economic conditions faced by Canadian resident professional visual artists” in 2012, with specific articles on ethnicity, sex, and gallery representation. The survey found that nearly one-half of Canadian visual artists lost money on their artistic practice in 2012 (47%). The average personal income of visual artists was $29,300, the largest portions of which came from art-related employment (average of $19,200) and non-art-related employment (average of $5,700). After adjusting for inflation, the overall average income in 2012 was 6% higher than the 2007 level ($27,600).