Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts advocacy

Based on a survey of more than 2,000 Canadians (including substantial samples of youth and Indigenous residents), this report highlights information about arts and heritage attendance, personal arts participation, as well as perceptions of cultural activities and government arts support. The report concludes that there is “robust public engagement with arts and culture in Canada”.

This report attempts to provide a “health check” for the arts in England. Between 2007/08 and 2013/14, the overall arts index increased from 99 to 111. Most of the increase in the index occurred between 2007 and 2011.

The 2016 report of the National Arts Index, based largely on data from 2013, highlights the “post-recession recovery” of the arts using 81 equally-weighted national indicators across four key dimensions: financial flows; capacity; arts participation; and competitiveness. The overall index value was 99.8 in 2013, higher than any year since 2009 but only back to the levels in the first two years measured (2002 and 2003). In other words, based on this index, the arts in America are in roughly the same health as in 2002.

This report argues that “public trust is of central importance to Canadian charities. It underpins many key relationships: with donors, volunteers, clients, policymakers, regulators, and corporate sponsors.” Based on a telephone survey of 3,853 Canadians 18 years or older, the report finds that 79% of respondents have "a lot" or "some" trust in charities. Trust in arts charities ranks eighth out of 11 types of charities, with 60% of Canadians indicating that they have a lot (19%) or some (41%) trust in arts charities.

Based on a non-random online survey of about 500 Toronto residents as well as three focus group sessions, this report indicates that 97% of respondents “see at least one benefit of the arts to the City of Toronto”. The two most commonly selected benefits to the City were attracting tourists (79%) and highlighting the city’s cultural diversity (71%).

Based on a random telephone survey of 1,000 Canadians commissioned by the Professional Association of Canadian Theatres (PACT) from Nanos Research in March 2014, this brief report and a summary fact sheet indicate that many Canadians believe in the importance of live theatre in Canadian communities. The survey results show that 84% of Canadians believe that live theatre plays an important or somewhat important role in “making communities across Canada vibrant places to live”.

Summary Report

Based on discussions at the Kingston Colloquium of the Visual Arts Alliance in 2011, this position paper attempts to identify “ways to make the visual arts more central in the lives of Canada and Canadians”. Five key themes emerged from the colloquium debates.

First edition – for consultation

This Australian report aims “to deliver a tool to enable governments, the [cultural] sector and the community to monitor the achievements of the sector, the role arts and culture play in economic and social agendas, and the vitality and cultural impact of Australian arts and cultural output”. Based on “extensive research on international developments in cultural measurement”, the study examines what indicators are available and relevant in an Australian context. Sixteen high-level cultural indicators, grouped under three main themes, are outlined in the report.

An Annual Measure of the Vitality of Arts and Culture in the United States: 1998-2010

The National Arts Index attempts to measure “the health and vitality of the arts in the U.S.” The report, released in 2012 and based largely on 2010 data, incorporates 83 equally-weighted national indicators across four key dimensions: financial flows; capacity; arts participation; and competitiveness. The report covers data from 1998 to 2010, with the base year being 2003 (when the index was set to 100). In 2010, the National Arts Index value was 96.7, the second-lowest level since 1998. The highest index values occurred in 2007 (103.4) and 1999 (103.3).

Based on a survey of 1,001 Canadians 18 or older in June and July of 2012, this report examines Canadians’ attendance and personal involvement in the arts, culture, and heritage, as well as their perceptions regarding cultural activities and government support of culture.