Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Creative class, cities, people, neighbourhoods

“Intended to contribute to more effective practice in cultural development planning”, this online resource could be used either to help create a new local cultural plan or assess an existing plan. The framework provides measurable outcomes for cultural activity in each of five domains (cultural, economic, environmental, governance and social).

(Les dépenses en culture des municipalités en 2015)

Quebec’s cultural observatory provides an annual summary of a survey of municipalities regarding their spending on the arts, culture, and heritage. Quebec municipalities’ operating expenditures on culture totalled $909 million in 2015, representing 4.8% of total municipal operating expenditures.

This report compares 173 measures of municipal activities in 36 service areas in 2016, one of which is culture. Overall, 15 municipalities from five provinces participated, but only eight reported data on their cultural grants and overall cultural expenditures (Calgary, Greater Sudbury, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Thunder Bay, Toronto, and Windsor).

With comparisons to seven other Canadian municipalities

This report summarizes non-financial supports provided by eight Canadian municipalities to the cultural sector in 2016, based on in-depth discussions and a survey of cultural staff members in the municipalities, which included District of Sechelt (B.C.), Edmonton, Saskatoon, London, Brampton, Mississauga, Greater Sudbury, and Halifax Regional Municipality. Eleven categories of non-monetary, or “indirect”, cultural investments were identified.

This report presents the results of a random telephone survey of 1,004 Ontario residents (18 and older) in early March 2017, bearing a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Respondents were asked a series of questions about their perceptions of the arts in Ontario, with specific questions regarding the quality of life, well-being, identity, belonging, and public arts funding. A vast majority of Ontarians believe that the arts are somewhat or very important to their own lives (85%) and to life in their community (90%).

Business & Employment in the Arts: Measuring the Scope of the Nation’s Arts-Related Industries

This brief report summarizes data on not-for-profit organizations and businesses “involved in the production or distribution of the arts”. Included in the definition are organizations and businesses such as not-for-profit orchestras, museums and theatres as well as “for-profit film, architecture, and advertising companies”. Overall, the report finds that there are just over 700,000 arts-related organizations and businesses in the U.S., employing 2.9 million people. “This represents 3.9 percent of all U.S. businesses and 1.9 percent of all U.S. employees—demonstrating statistically that the arts are a formidable business presence”.

This report provides a brief overview of key concepts regarding the term “the creative economy” as well as an extensive bibliography of reports related to the creative economy (as of 2013).

This study examines worldwide revenues and employment in 11 cultural and creative industries: advertising; architecture; books; gaming; movies; music; newspapers and magazines; performing arts; radio; television; and visual arts and design. Worldwide revenues in the cultural and creative industries totalled $2.25 trillion in 2013, or 3% of global GDP. (All figures are provided in US dollars.) The worldwide revenues of the cultural and creative industries exceed those of the telecommunications services industry ($1.6 trillion).

Based on Canadian, American, and United Kingdom employment surveys, this report compares the creative economy in the three countries. Based on the definitions used in the report, Canada’s creative economy is comprised of 2.2 million workers, including 534,000 creative workers in creative industries, 815,000 creative workers in non-creative industries, and 893,000 non-creative workers within the creative industries. Comparisons between the three countries show that Canada has the highest share of total employment on three related measures.

Hotbeds of America’s Arts and Culture

Arguing that “creativity is a desirable and necessary element for a thriving community”, this American report attempts to identify cities with particularly strong artistic vibrancy among 937 metropolitan areas in the U.S.A.