Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Human resources

This report, based on a survey of 210 American art museums in 2016 that followed up on issues uncovered in a similar survey in 2013, finds that a “gender gap persists” in art museums, despite “incremental gains in some areas of pay and employment representation”. Of the 210 responses from art museum directors in 2016, 100 were female (48%). While women direct most of the museums with budgets below $15 million (54%), female directors represent one-third or less of all museum directors in larger institutions.

Given the “severe lack of hard data” on diversity in Canadian art galleries, the author of this report, with assistance from anonymous collaborators, created a dataset of the diversity in select leadership positions in 80 galleries that have received core funding from the Canada Council for the Arts (as well as the separately-funded National Gallery of Canada). The resulting statistics indicate that “gallery management is whiter than Canadian [visual] artists in particular, and the Canadian public in general”. Regarding gender equity, the report finds that “women dominate Canada’s art field” but their majority is weakest in its top echelons.

Based on Canadian, American, and United Kingdom employment surveys, this report compares the creative economy in the three countries. Based on the definitions used in the report, Canada’s creative economy is comprised of 2.2 million workers, including 534,000 creative workers in creative industries, 815,000 creative workers in non-creative industries, and 893,000 non-creative workers within the creative industries. Comparisons between the three countries show that Canada has the highest share of total employment on three related measures.

Based on “a literature review, phone interviews, online surveys, artist roundtables and the development of an inventory of training providers”, this report examines the current situation and needs regarding skills training and supports for artists and arts organizations in Nunavut.

This series of research projects included three primary research endeavours: 1) a comparison of the finances of 19 B.C. arts, culture, and heritage organizations with 38 “peer” organizations in other provinces; 2) analysis of a province-wide survey of arts, culture, and heritage organizations; and 3) a summary of 14 qualitative interviews “related to human resources, community engagement and impacts, diversity, the entrepreneurial nature of B.C. arts organizations, and the nature of success for different groups”.

This aggregate profile of 184 Ontario museums “identifies the realities of operating museums in Ontario today” and provides “compelling evidence to demonstrate museum impacts and their economic, social and cultural contributions to Ontario’s communities”. The 184 Ontario museums responded to a survey designed and conducted by the Ontario Museum Association (OMA) in 2014-2015, and the survey results were analyzed by Hill Strategies Research Inc.

Needs and Supports of Canadian and US Ethnocultural Arts Organizations

This 358-page report presents a number of findings concerning “the characteristics, needs, and support systems” of “ethnocultural arts organizations”. The report is based on a literature review, data collection and analysis from existing sources (such as the Canada Revenue Agency), an assessment of organizations’ needs (using results from a custom survey of ethnocultural arts organizations as well as interviews with representatives of 55 Canadian and 83 American organizations), an assessment of support programs dedicated to diverse organizations (by 95 Canadian arts service organizations and funders), and an analysis of gaps in these supports (based on a comparison of organizations’ needs and existing supports).

A key finding of this report, which delves into statistics on arts and culture volunteers and donors, is that there were “1 million donors and 900,000 volunteers in arts and culture organizations” in 2013.

(Un portrait de la chanson québécoise)

Prepared for a 2013 Forum on Quebec Song, this French-language opinion piece attempts to stimulate reflection on the state of Quebec song and French-language song in particular.  Raising important questions, the article examines topics such as internationalization, technological change, touring, training, and funding. The article argues that “these days, much imagination is required to develop new sources of revenue” for singers, songwriters, and music groups.

An analysis of the educational backgrounds of working artists and the labour market activities of arts program graduates in Canada

Based on the 2013 National Graduates Survey and the 2011 National Household Survey, this report examines the labour force situation of arts graduates and the post-secondary education of artists in Canada.