Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Human resources

Based on experiences conducting demographic surveys of arts organizations in Chicago, Minnesota, Los Angeles, and Houston, this article outlines key findings regarding the measurement of identity-related characteristics (but not actual survey results). The surveys focused on five characteristics: race/ethnicity, age, gender, LBGTQ status, and disability status.

Based predominantly on a survey of 2,487 creative sector workers in the United Kingdom (called the Panic! Survey), this report concludes that “the cultural and creative industries are marked by significant inequalities”.

This report summarizes the diversity within English arts organizations in 2016/17, based largely on an annual Arts Council England survey completed by larger client organizations. The report’s diversity statistics include a focus on disability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

Based on a national survey to which 436 arts organizations responded in late 2017, this report provides information about salaries and benefits in 21 management and administrative positions in Canadian not-for-profit arts organizations.

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $56 million in Yukon, or 2.1% of territorial GDP
  • $76 million in the Northwest Territories, or 1.7% of territorial GDP
  • $48 million in Nunavut, or 2.0% of territorial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $543 million in New Brunswick, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $874 million in Nova Scotia, or 2.3% of provincial GDP
  • $108 million in Prince Edward Island in 2016, or 1.9% of provincial GDP
  • $414 million in Newfoundland and Labrador, or 1.4% of provincial GDP

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $25.7 billion in Ontario in 2016, or 3.5% of provincial GDP. In Quebec, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $11.0 billion in 2016, or 3.0% of provincial GDP.

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $7.2 billion in British Columbia, or 2.9% of provincial GDP
  • $5.3 billion in Alberta, or 1.7% of provincial GDP
  • $915 million in Saskatchewan, or 1.3% of provincial GDP
  • $1.6 billion in Manitoba, or 2.5% of provincial GDP

Using the product perspective, Statistics Canada estimates that the direct economic impact of culture products was $53.8 billion in Canada in 2016, or 2.8% of overall GDP. The employment estimate was 652,400 in 2016, or 3.5% of the 18.5 million jobs in the country.

This report, based on a survey of 210 American art museums in 2016 that followed up on issues uncovered in a similar survey in 2013, finds that a “gender gap persists” in art museums, despite “incremental gains in some areas of pay and employment representation”. Of the 210 responses from art museum directors in 2016, 100 were female (48%). While women direct most of the museums with budgets below $15 million (54%), female directors represent one-third or less of all museum directors in larger institutions.