Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Nonprofit sector information

While 59% of Canadians had volunteered at some point in their lives, 44% did so in 2013. For the 12.7 million volunteers in 2013, the most common activities include organizing events (46% of all volunteers participated in this activity), fundraising (45%), and sitting on a committee or board (33%)

Based on the General Social Survey on Giving, Volunteering, and Participating, this article highlights the gifts of time and money made by individuals to all types of not-for-profit organizations in 2013. Overall, 44% of Canadians volunteered a total of 1.96 billion hours in not-for-profit organizations in 2013, “equivalent to about 1 million full-time jobs”. Regarding donating, the article finds that 82% of Canadians donated a total of $12.8 billion to not-for-profit organizations in 2013.

A key finding of this report, which delves into statistics on arts and culture volunteers and donors, is that there were “1 million donors and 900,000 volunteers in arts and culture organizations” in 2013.

This report argues that “public trust is of central importance to Canadian charities. It underpins many key relationships: with donors, volunteers, clients, policymakers, regulators, and corporate sponsors.” Based on a telephone survey of 3,853 Canadians 18 years or older, the report finds that 79% of respondents have "a lot" or "some" trust in charities. Trust in arts charities ranks eighth out of 11 types of charities, with 60% of Canadians indicating that they have a lot (19%) or some (41%) trust in arts charities.

Enhancing governance and effectiveness

This document from Imagine Canada, the national association of charities, is intended to support charitable organizations by providing a “Canada-wide set of shared standards for charities and nonprofits designed to strengthen their capacity in five fundamental areas: board governance; financial accountability & transparency; fundraising; staff management; and volunteer involvement.”

Based on an online survey with 1,909 respondents between November 2012 and January 2013 (representing leaders from many different types of charitable organizations), this report provides a broad overview of the current situation of the not-for-profit sector in Canada and the confidence of charity leaders given the current economic and social context. While 44% of charity leaders indicated that their expenditures had increased over the past year, only 24% saw an increase in revenues. One-quarter of all organizations (26%) had a decrease in revenues over the past year. Only 10% saw their expenditures decrease.

Executive Summary

Based on a 2012 survey of 180 community investment professionals working in Canadian businesses, this report examines how businesses support community initiatives. The survey found that the four most common types of community investments are “contributing money to community organizations; providing contributions through sponsorships or marketing activities; providing in-kind resources, services and goods; and supporting employee volunteering programs”.

A summary of findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on a survey of 1,500 businesses, this fact sheet highlights select findings regarding the corporate community investment practices of all responding businesses as well as a breakout of 93 larger corporations (revenues over $25 million). The survey found that 76% of all businesses provided funding to not-for-profit organizations. Almost all large corporations (97%) did so. The broader business community gave a slightly larger percentage of their pre-tax profits (1.25%) than large corporations (1%).

Findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community (presentation)

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this presentation provides detailed findings regarding corporate community investment practices, motivations, and challenges. Regarding business views of not-for-profit organizations, the survey found that 73% of all businesses agree that “charities and nonprofits generally improve the quality of life in Canada”.

Further findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this report examines which industry sectors tend to provide different types of support. The goal of this information is to help not-for-profit organizations “tailor their corporate fundraising to the sectors that are most likely to be responsive to their specific needs”.