Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Volunteers & donors

While 59% of Canadians had volunteered at some point in their lives, 44% did so in 2013. For the 12.7 million volunteers in 2013, the most common activities include organizing events (46% of all volunteers participated in this activity), fundraising (45%), and sitting on a committee or board (33%)

Based on the General Social Survey on Giving, Volunteering, and Participating, this article highlights the gifts of time and money made by individuals to all types of not-for-profit organizations in 2013. Overall, 44% of Canadians volunteered a total of 1.96 billion hours in not-for-profit organizations in 2013, “equivalent to about 1 million full-time jobs”. Regarding donating, the article finds that 82% of Canadians donated a total of $12.8 billion to not-for-profit organizations in 2013.

A key finding of this report, which delves into statistics on arts and culture volunteers and donors, is that there were “1 million donors and 900,000 volunteers in arts and culture organizations” in 2013.

This report provides “evidence-based insights into the health of U.S. arts and cultural organizations”, based on more than 55,000 arts and cultural organizations. The report is very detailed, with data related to 128 indices and in-depth reporting on 26 indices.

Ripple Effects from the Arts Sector

This report examines the benefits “for people, communities and the economy” of arts organizations receiving operating funding from the Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) over a seven year period (2006-2013). In addition to statistics from operating funding recipients, the report includes statistics from other sources, such as a public survey that was conducted in the province.

Results of Business for the Arts’ 2014 Research Initiative

As the report’s title indicates, one of the key findings of this presentation of ongoing research is that many Canadians look favourably on companies that support the arts. A public survey found that 52% of respondents “feel more favourably towards businesses that support arts and culture”.

Key findings

The goal of the research outlined in this presentation was to provide “reliable, detailed data on public art galleries across Ontario”, thereby influencing art gallery sector analysis as well as organizations’ benchmarking and future planning.

GIA’s Annual Research on Support for Arts and Culture

These brief articles highlight government support for the arts in 2013 and foundation support for the arts and culture in 2011 in the United States. The article on public funding indicates that total government funding for the arts in the U.S. was estimated at $1.14 billion in 2013. Local governments provided the most support for the arts (over $700 million, although exact figures by level of government were not provided in the article). State legislatures appropriated nearly $300 million for the arts, and the federal appropriation for the National Endowment for the Arts was under $140 million in 2013. Total government funding for the arts decreased by 30% after inflation between 1992 and 2013. Based on a sample of 1,122 larger foundations in the U.S., the article on foundation funding estimated arts and culture funding to be 10% of foundation funding for all fields of giving.

A study on the multichannel preferences and charitable habits of Generation Y, Generation X, Baby Boomers and Civics

Based on an online survey of 809 Canadians outside of Quebec who made a financial donation to a not-for-profit organization over the year before the survey (May 2013), this report examines generational differences in charitable giving. Unfortunately, the report does not provide the margins of error of the overall statistics or the generational breakdowns. As such, its statistical validity is difficult to assess (although the sample size would be representative at the national level, if it were a random survey). In addition, the report does not indicate why Quebec respondents were excluded in 2013 after being included in a similar 2010 survey. The report estimates that the share of current donations among the generations to all types of not-for-profit organizations is: Civics (25%), Boomers (32%), Generation X (27%), and Generation Y (15%).

Executive Summary

Based on a 2012 survey of 180 community investment professionals working in Canadian businesses, this report examines how businesses support community initiatives. The survey found that the four most common types of community investments are “contributing money to community organizations; providing contributions through sponsorships or marketing activities; providing in-kind resources, services and goods; and supporting employee volunteering programs”.