Territorial estimates from Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators, 2016

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Yukon

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $56 million in Yukon in 2016, or 2.1% of territorial GDP. The culture employment estimate was 860 in 2016, or 3.0% of all jobs in the territory. The value added of culture products in Yukon is below the national average (2.1% in Yukon vs. 2.8% nationally), and the employment impact is also lower in Yukon (3.0%) than nationally (3.5%).

Between 2010 and 2016, the GDP of culture products increased by 8% in Yukon. Growth in the overall territorial economy resulted in a slight decrease in culture’s share of the territorial economy between 2010 and 2016 (from 2.3% to 2.1%).

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $61 million in Yukon in 2016, which represents 2.3% of territorial GDP. In 2016, there were 910 jobs directly related to culture industries in Yukon, or 3.2% of all jobs in the territory.

In Yukon, the GDP of culture industries ($61 million) is larger than the value added of utilities ($48 million) but less than the value added of accommodation and food services ($82 million), transportation and warehousing ($86 million), educational services ($141 million), and construction ($209 million).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2016 ($7 million, or 0.2% of the territory’s GDP). The value added of culture ($61 million) is about nine times larger than the sports estimate.

 

Northwest Territories

In 2016, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $76 million in the Northwest Territories, or 1.7% of territorial GDP. The culture employment estimate was 900 in 2016, or 2.7% of all jobs in the territory. The value added of culture products in NWT is below the national average (1.7% in NWT vs. 2.8% nationally), and the employment impact is also lower in NWT (2.7%) than nationally (3.5%).

Between 2010 and 2016, the GDP of culture products grew by 13% in NWT. This resulted in an increase in culture’s share of the territorial economy between 2010 and 2016 (from 1.4% to 1.7).

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $81 million in the Northwest Territories in 2016 (1.8% of territorial GDP). In 2016, there were 980 jobs directly related to culture industries in the Northwest Territories, or 3.0% of the territory’s jobs.

In the Northwest Territories, the GDP of culture industries ($81 million) is larger than the value added of accommodation and food services ($75 million) and utilities ($77 million) but less than the GDP of educational services ($223 million), transportation and warehousing ($403 million), and construction ($503 million).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2016 ($9 million, or 0.2% of the territory’s GDP). The value added of culture ($81 million) is nine times larger than the sports estimate.

 

Nunavut

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products was estimated at $48 million in Nunavut in 2016, or 2.0% of territorial GDP. The culture employment estimate was 320 in 2016, or 1.8% of all jobs in the territory. The value added of culture products in Nunavut is below the national average (2.0% in Nunavut vs. 2.8% nationally), and the employment impact is also lower in Nunavut (1.8%) than nationally (3.5%).

Between 2010 and 2016, the GDP of culture products grew by 10% in Nunavut. Growth in the overall territorial economy resulted in a decrease in culture’s share of the territorial economy between 2010 and 2016 (from 2.3% to 2.0%).

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $70 million in Nunavut in 2016, or 2.9% of territorial GDP. In 2016, there were 400 jobs directly related to culture industries in Nunavut, or 2.2% of all jobs in the territory.

In Nunavut, the GDP of culture industries ($70 million) is larger than the value added of accommodation and food services ($24 million), transportation and warehousing ($63 million), and utilities ($64 million). On the other hand, the value added of culture is less than that of educational services ($172 million) and construction ($266 million).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2016 ($8.5 million, or 0.3% of the territory’s GDP). The value added of culture ($70 million) is eight times larger than the sports estimate.

Summary: 

Based on Statistics Canada’s product perspective, the direct economic impact of culture products in 2016 was estimated at:

  • $56 million in Yukon, or 2.1% of territorial GDP
  • $76 million in the Northwest Territories, or 1.7% of territorial GDP
  • $48 million in Nunavut, or 2.0% of territorial GDP