Arts Research Monitor

The Arts Research Monitor, created by Hill Strategies Research in 2002, provides synopses of qualitative and quantitative research findings in the arts and culture. The Monitor should be useful to artists, arts managers, funders, policy makers, researchers and others with an interest in learning more about the arts and culture. The Arts Research Monitor is funded by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

23 May 2018

This report compares 173 measures of municipal activities in 36 service areas in 2016, one of which is culture. Overall, 15 municipalities from five provinces participated, but only eight reported data on their cultural grants and overall cultural expenditures (Calgary, Greater Sudbury, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Thunder Bay, Toronto, and Windsor).

23 May 2018

This report summarizes non-financial supports provided by eight Canadian municipalities to the cultural sector in 2016, based on in-depth discussions and a survey of cultural staff members in the municipalities, which included District of Sechelt (B.C.), Edmonton, Saskatoon, London, Brampton, Mississauga, Greater Sudbury, and Halifax Regional Municipality. Eleven categories of non-monetary, or “indirect”, cultural investments were identified.

25 April 2018

This literature review, which examines English-language publications since 2000 related to the non-economic effects of culture, found that there is “a deluge of recent literature citing the (usually positive) impacts of engagement with the arts and, to a lesser extent, heritage”.

25 April 2018

This report “aims to summarize research in the areas of theory, evidence, measurement frameworks and indicators” of the social benefits of culture. The review found “wide evidence of positive effects of arts and culture in society” but a lack of “consensus on how to measure the results”.

25 April 2018

This brief report focuses on a few studies related to the social and economic benefits of cultural engagement. The review found that “people benefit in multiple ways when there is a vibrant arts and culture base in their community and that taking part or engaging in arts and cultural activities1 has certain positive effects on individual well-being”.