Arts Research Monitor

The Arts Research Monitor, created by Hill Strategies Research in 2002, provides synopses of qualitative and quantitative research findings in the arts and culture. The Monitor should be useful to artists, arts managers, funders, policy makers, researchers and others with an interest in learning more about the arts and culture. The Arts Research Monitor is funded by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

31 January 2018

This international literature review attempts “to better understand whether research has shown that arts experiences of any kind – whether conventional audience experiences or newer “engagement” experiences, learning in the arts, or making art itself – affect civic engagement”. A key finding of the report is that “correlations between arts participation and the motivations and practices of civic engagement are substantial and consistent.” However, “the effects of the arts are likely to be cumulative over significant time and difficult to document: a slow drip rather than a sudden eruption, and easy to take for granted”.

31 January 2018

The nine video presentations in this series outline findings “from three years of strategic experimentation and shared learning” by seven arts organizations, with the overarching goal of better understanding “how to engage with audiences and build communities”.

22 November 2017

Drawing on the results of a variety of mostly American surveys, this brief article argues that there are “troubling signs that socioeconomic status does correlate with access to a professional arts career”.

22 November 2017

This report, based on responses from 26,200 alumni of arts programs in 43 American institutions, provides “insights into the current state of career skills and entrepreneurship education in arts schools”. The author argues that “building strong business and entrepreneurial skills will prepare [arts] students for a career in a job market that increasingly rewards entrepreneurship”.

22 November 2017

Based on 11 case studies of Canadian artists, collectives, and organizations engaged in multidisciplinary practices, this report identifies “key characteristics of multidisciplinary approaches … to develop and sustain their practices, activities and structures” as well as their key challenges and opportunities. The report notes that multidisciplinary artists’ “activities include the mixing of artistic disciplines, community- and socially-engaged arts, Aboriginal and culturally diverse arts practices, technology, science, and the blending of for-profit and not-for-profit mandates, among others."