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Western provincial estimates from Provincial and Territorial Culture Satellite Account, 2010

August 19, 201519 August 2015

Issue
Economic benefits of culture

Article Link
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/13-604-m/13-604-m2015079-eng.htm

British Columbia

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $6.1 billion in British Columbia in 2010, or 3.2% of provincial GDP. The value added of culture industries in B.C., as a proportion of total provincial GDP, is slightly below the national average (3.4%). Culture industries in British Columbia represent 11.4% of the national GDP of culture industries. The largest contributors to the GDP of culture industries in B.C. in 2010 were visual and applied arts ($1.6 billion) and audiovisual and interactive media (also $1.6 billion).

In 2010, there were 94,800 jobs directly related to culture industries in B.C., or 4.1% of total employment. This percentage is equal to the national average. The B.C. jobs total represents 13.4% of nationwide employment in culture industries.

In B.C., the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($3.2 billion), utilities ($4.0 billion), and accommodation and food services ($5.5 billion). However, the value added of culture is less than that of mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($9.0 billion), transportation and warehousing ($10.0 billion), and construction ($14.3 billion).

The Culture Satellite Account also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2010 ($919 million, or 0.5% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($6.1 billion) is almost seven times larger than the sports estimate, despite the 2010 Winter Olympics being held in B.C.

 

Alberta

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $5.5 billion in Alberta in 2010 (2.1% of provincial GDP). The value added of culture industries in Alberta, as a proportion of the province’s overall GDP, is well below the national average (3.4%). Culture industries in Alberta represent 10.3% of the Canadian GDP of culture industries. The largest contributors to the GDP of culture industries in Alberta in 2010 were audiovisual and interactive media ($1.7 billion) and visual and applied arts ($1.2 billion).

In 2010, there were 62,300 jobs directly related to culture industries in Alberta, or 3.0% of total employment. This percentage is also below the national average (4.1%). The Alberta jobs total represents 8.8% of nationwide employment in culture industries.

In Alberta, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($3.6 billion), utilities ($3.9 billion), and accommodation and food services ($5.1 billion). On the other hand, the value added of culture is less than that of transportation and warehousing ($10.9 billion), construction ($25.2 billion), and mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($63.5 billion).

The Culture Satellite Account also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2010 ($620 million, or 0.2% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($5.5 billion) is about nine times larger than the sports estimate.

 

Saskatchewan

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $1.2 billion in Saskatchewan in 2010, or 2.0% of provincial GDP. The value added of culture industries in Saskatchewan, as a proportion of total provincial GDP, is well below the national average (3.4%). Culture industries in Saskatchewan represent 2.3% of the national GDP of culture industries. The largest contributors to the GDP of culture industries in Saskatchewan in 2010 were audiovisual and interactive media ($496 million), written and published works ($161 million), and visual and applied arts ($160 million).

In 2010, there were 15,100 jobs directly related to culture industries in Saskatchewan, or 2.7% of total employment. This percentage is also below the national average (4.1%). The Saskatchewan jobs total represents 2.1% of Canadian employment in culture industries.

In Saskatchewan, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the impact of accommodation and food services ($984 million) and equal to that of utilities ($1.2 billion). However, the value added of culture is less than that of transportation and warehousing ($2.8 billion), agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($3.6 billion), construction ($4.5 billion), and mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($15.3 billion).

The Culture Satellite Account also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2010 ($154 million, or 0.3% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($1.2 billion) is about eight times larger than the sports estimate.

 

Manitoba

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $1.4 billion in Manitoba in 2010 (2.8% of provincial GDP). The value added of culture industries in Manitoba, as a proportion of the province’s overall GDP, is below the national average (3.4%). Culture industries in Manitoba represent 2.6% of the Canadian GDP of culture industries. The largest contributors to the GDP of culture industries in Manitoba in 2010 were written and published works ($361 million), audiovisual and interactive media ($295 million), and visual and applied arts ($204 million).

In 2010, there were 22,000 jobs directly related to culture industries in Manitoba, or 3.4% of total employment. This percentage is also below the national average (4.1%). The Manitoba jobs total represents 3.1% of nationwide employment in culture industries.

In Manitoba, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of accommodation and food services ($932 million) and utilities ($1.2 billion). On the other hand, the value added of culture is less than that of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($1.7 billion), mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($2.0 billion), transportation and warehousing ($2.8 billion), and construction ($3.3 billion).

The Culture Satellite Account also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2010 ($129 million, or 0.3% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($1.4 billion) is over ten times larger than the sports estimate.

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